Rest in peace Roger Ebert…

Beloved poet, writer, film critic and creator of the term “Cinema Interruptus” passed away on April 4, 2013.

When I saw “Hiroshima, Mon Amor” (1959), I was young and eager and excited to be attending one of the first French art films I’d ever seen. It helped teach me what it was, and who I was. Now I see that the film, its actors and its meaning have all been carried on, and that the firemen are going to come looking for all of us one of these days, sooner or later.

This is now. We are filled with optimism and expectation. Why would we want to see such a film, however brilliantly it has been made? I think it’s because a film like “Amour” has a lesson for us that only the cinema can teach: the cinema, with its heedless ability to leap across time and transcend lives and dramatize what it means to be a member of humankind’s eternal audience.

– Roger Ebert, 2012

Thank you for everything — all the valuable knowledge and perspectives shared in thousands of articles, reviews, commentaries are testament to your legacy.

Goodnight, sweet prince.

See you at the movies…

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3 responses to “Rest in peace Roger Ebert…

  1. I loved Roger Ebert but he was totally wrong about “Hiroshima, Mon Amour.” It could have been the most boring movie I ever saw. Maybe it was better in French.

    • Thanks for pointing that out. 😀

      Admittedly, I haven’t actually seen Hiroshima, mon amour. Would be worth checking out the film for myself before deciding whether Ebert’s review is accurate. As of now, with the exception of Cloud Atlas (which he indicated may warrant reassessment), most ratings were consistently on point.

      • If you’re willing to watch it, I’m willing to supply the NoDoz. LOL. If you want to make it a double feature, I highly recommend “The Member of the Wedding,” starring Julie Harris. I kept waiting for something to happen and it never did. Only thing good was exterior shots of Colusa, CA, a small town where I lived.

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